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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

  • Beautiful things grow when we work together for good.

3 ways singing is good for your health

3 ways singing is good for your health

Singing has been one of humanity’s most joyful pastimes for thousands of years. Joining in with a group to make music is proven to reduce stress while encouraging people to work together to create unique art.

The physical, psychological and social benefits of singing with others have been widely studied, showing the endless ways anyone can enjoy music—regardless of musical ability. No matter the singing skills anyone thinks they have, we all deserve to sing together. It’s one of the few wonderful things that unites us, so get your friends together for caroling, sing in your car or do anything you want to bring music into your life.

 

Singing boosts empathy.

When you sing with a group, you are all working together to create a piece of music greater than the sum of your parts. Studies have shown that this shared experience can help people better understand the perspectives and feelings of others. 

Music also crosses language barriers to allow people from different cultures to connect. Singing music from different cultures can give a greater appreciation for them.

 

Singing improves memory.

Catchy melodies and lyrics are easier to memorize than most things without music, and that’s not just because they get stuck in your head. Associating words, feelings and actions with music makes it easier for your brain to remember them. 

Learning a new song engages your brain in unique ways that sharpens your memory and clears your mind of clutter.

 

Singing lowers your blood pressure.

And it provides a huge variety of other physical benefits too. When you sing, you regulate and slow your breathing which relaxes you and lowers your heart rate. You also engage your diaphragm, facial muscles and abdomen to stretch and exercise them.

As you sing, your anxiety reduces and the stress hormone, cortisol, decreases in your brain. When you have low cortisol levels, your immunity against sickness increases, making you healthier overall.