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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

  • Beautiful things grow when we work together for good.

Why Giving is Good for You

If you hate holiday shopping, this might make you feel just a little bit better about it. Research suggests that giving has multiple benefits, for both the recipient and the giver.

Consider this:

Giving makes you happy. A Harvard Business School study found that giving money to someone else lifted participants’ happiness more that spending it on themselves. Happiness expert Sonja Lyubomirsky, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, saw similar results when she asked people to perform five acts of kindness each week for six weeks.

Similarly, a study conducted at the National Institute of Health found that when people give to charities, it activates regions of the brain associated with pleasure, creating a “warm glow” effect. Scientists also believe that altruistic behavior releases endorphins in the brain, producing the positive feeling known as the “helper’s high.”

Giving is good for your health. Significant research has linked generosity to better health, even among the sick and elderly. Studies have shown that one reason giving may improve physical health and longevity is that it helps decrease stress, which is associated with a variety of health problems. In a study by Rachel Piferi of Johns Hopkins University and Kathleen Lawler of the University of Tennessee, people who provided social support to others had lower blood pressure than participants who didn’t.

Giving leads to social connection. Several studies have shown that when you give to others, your generosity is likely to be rewarded by others down the line—sometimes by the person you gave to, sometimes by someone else. According to research, having positive social interactions is central to good mental and physical health. Additionally, when we give to others, we don’t only make them feel closer to us; we also feel closer to them. “Being kind and generous leads you to perceive others more positively and more charitably,” writes Lyubomirsky in her book The How of Happiness, and this “fosters a heightened sense of interdependence and cooperation in your social community.”