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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

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How To Buy Sustainable Clothing

Last week was Earth Day, and while most think about planting trees and recycling, textile waste is a prevalent problem contributing to global warming. Pamela Norum's study, published in the Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, surveyed more than 500 American baby boomers and millennials about their clothing consumption practices. “In 2012, Americans created more than 14.3 million tons of textile waste." Most textile waste is due to ignorance in basic sewing skills and buying throw-away clothes.

We either don't know how or don't care to fix minor stains or tears. Norum added, "If we, as a nation, want to move toward more sustainable practices in all aspects, we need to evaluate not only how we take care of our clothes, but how we educate younger generations to do so as well." This means that if we follow these three sustainable practices, we can minimize textile waste:

Thrifting—Second-hand clothes are not only cheaper, but decreases the amount of thrown-away clothes. Buying used clothes minimizes manufacturing demands and keeps the items out of landfills. Additionally, most thrift shops give back and support the community.

Handmade—Investing in clothing is on a downward trend. Think of clothing as heirlooms and as lasting pieces in life. Invest in a one-of-a-kind handmade piece of clothing that will stand up to life’s wear and tear.

Organic—Cotton that is grown with the use of pesticides pollutes natural resources, and the residues are still traceable through wearing clothing. These increase the harm and risk for textile workers and textile wearers. Organic clothing is healthier without all the chemicals and pesticides.