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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

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National Freedom Day is February 1

National Freedom Day is observed two weeks after Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. It is not a public holiday, but it is observed with the same mindset of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. It celebrates the signing of the 13th amendment into law. The 13th amendment abolished slavery and ended the Civil War in 1865. Namely, it outlawed previous Constitutional clauses such as the Three-Fifths Compromise which defined the slave population as only three-fifths of a person. This was a great victory for the people of the United States. Here are some ways to pay tribute to those who fought valiantly for freedom:

Read about civil rights heroes—Pick up a book at your local library and read about civil rights heroes. Look for biographies and accounts of people who dedicated their lives to gain freedom and equality for citizens of the United States. Just a few of the most famous civil rights heroes are: Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr., Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Gloria Steinem.

Talk to your kids—There is no age too young to start learning about civil liberties. Take some time to go through each amendment with your children and discuss the importance of each. Look online for stimulating and fun activities about the Constitution.

Volunteer—Unfortunately, slavery is still a modern-day problem. Even though it is illegal, slavery happens every day in the United States and all around the world in the form of human trafficking. You can help to fight those who sustain human trafficking by volunteering for a local anti-human trafficking nonprofit. Or go to tinyhandsinternational.org, the largest nonprofit that fights human trafficking, to locate a local chapter of Tiny Hands International.