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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

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3 Important Snow Safety Tips

Winter officially begins on December 21, but many people across the country have already felt its wrath. Wintry weather means more dangerous conditions for driving, bicycling and even walking. Unfortunately, emergency room visits—related to snow and ice accidents—spike during December and January. Take extra precaution before venturing into the risky weather conditions. Here are tips to be safe this winter for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists:

Pedestrians—Dress for the weather: gloves, scarves, heavy-duty socks and boots, coat and hat. Walk slowly and carefully. Be aware of ice on sidewalks and give yourself plenty of time to get where you need to go. Because of the sun rays reflecting on snow, protect any visible skin with sunscreen and protect your eyes with sunglasses. Avoid walking at night, if possible.

Cyclists—Avoid cycling directly on snow or ice; wait for clearing or melting. Check your gears and brakes for ice and dirt before traveling outside. Always watch for black ice, a thin and clear sheet of ice that is especially dangerous because it looks like dry pavement.

Motorists—Only drive if necessary. Slow down and keep a safe distance in relation to other motorists. Keep your gas tank full, and scrape all the snow and ice from your vehicle’s hood, roof, windows and lights before driving. Lastly, always be aware of black ice and other hazardous road conditions.