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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

  • Beautiful things grow when we work together for good.

October is National Bullying Prevention Month

Bullying is a prevalent problem and causes many detrimental effects. Depression, low self-esteem and suicide are a few outcomes of prolonged bullying. According to StopBullying.gov, “Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time.”

Bullying comes in the three forms: Verbal, social and physical. Bullying can range from teasing and name-calling to spreading rumors and hitting. Bullying usually occurs at school, and according to StopBullying.gov, “About 20% of students in grades 9-12 experienced bullying.” National Bullying Prevention Month presents an opportunity to learn more about the prevalence of bullying and how to stop it. StopBullying.gov outlines 5 steps to take to stand against bullying:

Assess bullying in school— Talk to your children about bullying in their school. Are they bullied? Are they bullying another? Is it verbal, social or physical or a combination? Take a step further and talk to the school psychologist to grasp the bullying situation at school.

Engage the community— Educate parents about the signs of bullying and bring the issue to light. Create a unified message against bullying at schools in the community. Form committees and routine meetings to discuss efforts to stop bullying.

Create policies and rules— Assess the school code of conduct and any published statement of bullying. Create a mission statement against bullying and craft an effective reporting system for students and staff.

Build a safe environment— Establish the school environment as open and accepting. Use school newsletters, parent meetings and assemblies to establish a positive school atmosphere.

Educate students and staff— Create bullying prevention education materials and distribute throughout the school. Hold informational sessions and speak to classrooms. Provide students and staff with skills to stop, prevent and report bullying.