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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

  • Beautiful things grow when we work together for good.

October is a Month to Celebrate Loyal Best Friends

There’s a bad stereotype revolving around rescue dogs: they the ones nobody wants, the misbehaved ones, the biters, the mutts. This is simply not true.

Most shelter dogs ended up where they are because of reasons beyond their control, whether their owner died or family moved away, they were displaced by a new baby, or even if they have a small behavioral issue it’s likely because their former owner didn’t try hard enough to fix it.

Shelter dogs are by no means lesser. (In fact, about 25% of shelter dogs available for adoption are purebreds.) Most are healthy, affectionate animals and will simply need a few readjustments to learn how to fit into your home.

Sure, puppies are fluffy, adorable balls of fur. But they also require a lot of work. House-training requires time and patience. Fresh out of that? Consider an older dog.

Some of the benefits of adopting an older dog include:

They’re easy to train. They’ll be house-trained and better yet, focused and capable of learning new tricks. Additionally you won’t find them nomming on a pair of your favorite kicks. They have manners and likely already know the basic sit, stay, down commands.

WYSIWYG. (Pronounced “wizzy-wig”.) Whereas puppies can grow to unplanned sizes, with an older dog you’ll know their size and personality right away.

They aren’t a 24/7 job. Unlike puppies, older dogs can go several hours without being monitored (granted those puppy pics of a dog covered in feathers and toilet paper are darn cute, but to some also a bit aggravating).

You save their life. At most shelters, older dogs are the last to be adopted and first to be euthanized. Saving them from a kill shelter provides an unparalleled bond (even if you claim you “aren’t a dog person,” trust us, you’ll become one).

No matter which pup you pick, they’re all winners. Big, little, guardian, comedian, purebred, mutt—they’ll be the most loyal, lovable best friend you’ve ever met.