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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

  • Beautiful things grow when we work together for good.

Questions to Ask When Volunteering as a Family

What’s the first step in volunteering as a family? Get your family on board, of course. Have a positive attitude going into the process to show your kids that volunteering and giving back to your community is fun. (And be sure to fully be on board yourself before bringing it up to the clan.)

Decide how much time you think they’ll be willing to commit. Perhaps start with a single day (Thanksgiving Day?) and see how it goes. Or, if you’re feeling ambitious, look into weekly opportunities. It’s a great bonding opportunity—and a unique one at that.

Now, decide a few things as a family:

What are your goals? Getting to know about a new community? Making an impact in a specific place (such as a park or school)? Having fun as a family?

Different goals should impact where you choose to volunteer. For example, a family looking to have fun might work at a community theater or participate in a charity baking event.

What activities do your family enjoy doing together? Being outside? Sports? Reading? Board games? Movies?

A family that enjoys being outdoors could plant a vegetable garden in a low-income neighborhood. A family that likes sports could volunteer at a community center playing with kids. Look for activities that your entire family enjoys—it’ll feel less like work and more like giving back.

Consider checking out places that your family already frequents (a zoo, a library, community center, etc.). Younger kids will feel more comfortable being somewhere familiar. And, better yet, if they return they can see the results of their efforts later on.

What skills does your family have? Is your family bilingual? Do you enjoy cooking together? What other special skills do you all have in common?

If you speak another language you could work at a center for new immigrants or tutoring programs for students with language barriers. If your family likes to cook, consider preparing a meal at a soup kitchen.

Keep in mind that younger kids need simpler jobs. But that doesn’t mean they can’t get involved.

Be sure to select something that the entire family can do and looks forward to. Volunteering shouldn’t be stressful. It can teach kids valuable lessons and bond a family—it just takes a little planning to find the perfect fit.