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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

  • Beautiful things grow when we work together for good.

Mumbling With Bubbly—The Special Message of a New Year’s Song

Oh, it’s inevitable. On New Year’s Eve the countdown and smack of lips give way to a quiet, uncertain mumble. Your friends trail off. At the stroke of midnight your party hesitantly (if you’re like most) sings Auld Lang Syne. Neither the champagne nor the late hour is to blame.

Precious few know the words to this rarely heard song. And they certainly don’t know what it means. But Auld Lang Syne has a special altruistic message that informs our approach to philanthropy. Perhaps it will inspire your charitable endeavors in 2013 as well.

Burn(s) Notice
In 1788 Robert Burns wrote the Scotts poem Auld Lang Syne to the tune of a Scottish folk song. In English the first line means, loosely, “for the sake of old times.” Burns’ poem is an important reminder not to forsake old friendships. Beginning the New Year singing of our old friends would be a grand start to a year dedicated to outreach and personal connection.

Reach Out
Consider how much better you feel after a long talk with an old friend. You can offload your worries to one another, encourage each other and reminisce about past years you both miss.

Some people are more isolated than others—whether language barriers complicate meeting new people or because they are new in town. Open yourself up to them. You could be an important personal connection your new friend desperately needs. Just think—down the road you may sing Auld Lang Syne in honor of the friends you made in 2013.

Old New Friends
Language and relocation aren’t the only things that make people in your community feel lost or disconnected. The sick and the elderly are especially at risk for loneliness. Especially during the holidays, the quiet of the nursing home or hospital bed can be unbearable. So visit a nursing home regularly. Write a letter to your out-of-state grandparents. Visit family members who are sick, or become a hospital volunteer.

In Auld Lang Syne Burns writes, “Since thoughts of thee doth banish grief, when from thee I am gone; will not thy presence yield relief, to this sad Heart of mine.” We hope Burns’ lyrics inspire your New Year.

Resolve to take care of the people around you, so that you can banish grief and cheer sad hearts.