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Updates to Service Delivery by Heartland RADAC due to COVID - 19

 

It is the intention of Heartland RADAC to continue serving clients to the best of our ability, while adhering to the restrictions of the Statewide Stay at Home Order No 20-16, issued by Governor Kelly, which went into effect on March 30, 2020.   https://governor.kansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EO20-16.pdf

In order to continue providing services, Heartland RADAC has made a few adjustments to allow us to continue working with clients by phone and telemed/video, while maintaining the social distancing requirements due to COVID – 19.   

All Assessments, Case Management, Peer/Recovery Coaching and Treatment will be performed via phone and/or video depending on the technology available. 

When you call in to the agency main number, our schedulers will ask you a series of questions to make sure you have the ability to complete an assessment.  Once scheduled,  our staff will assist you in getting connected to you based on your responses to the following questions.   

Questions re: technology will include: 

1) Do you have the ability to download an app on your computer or phone? 

2) If yes – are you willing to download the app needed to complete a service via video. 

3) Do you have an email? Are you currently able to retrieve emails? 

4) What is your contact number we can reach you? 

5) Is there an identified Voicemail, where we can leave a confidential message? 

Please call us at 913-789-0951 or 1-800-281-0029 to schedule an assessment.

 https://www.hradac.com/what_we_do/hradacconsentandreleaseforms.html

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The cause of breast cancer has gained a lot of exposure and awareness in recent years, especially thanks to the National Football League. You may have noticed the touches of pink on NFL players’ uniforms this month, as October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. According to Komen.org, “In 2012, breast cancer accounted for nearly 25% of all cancers.” Here are a few tips from Komen.org to help you diagnose breast cancer or help someone going through the experience:

What is Breast Cancer?
Breast cancer is the result of malfunctioning cells and there is an increase in cell growth and not cell death. The balance between cell growth and cell death is crucial to organ systems. The result of this growth is a malignant tumor, meaning cancer.

Mammography Screening
Regular mammography screening is important in early detection. If there is a family history of breast cancer, screenings are recommended to start as early as in your twenties. Not all breast cancers are diagnosed through mammography, so self-evaluation is crucial. Visit Komen.org for the most common symptoms.

Social Support
If someone you love is diagnosed with breast cancer, it is important to provide social support through their wide range of emotions. Your loved one will experience shock, fear, sadness and anger. Time may ease these emotions, but your support will be crucial. Social support reduces anxiety, depression, fatigue and many other emotional symptoms of cancer.